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High objects of State (letters patent from Queen Victoria, each w/ Great Seal):
Author of Balfour Declaration - 1898 diplomatic credentials, for talks with Germany
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Chancellor of the Exchequer letters patent of Gladstone, 1873 

The (Swedish General) Viktor Balck Olympic Games- Founding Archive
Swedish gold and bronze medals honoring Viktor Balck | Viktor Balck 1912 Stockholm Olympics book Tower and Sword collar of Viktor Balck

Civil War Gillmore Medal to Jewish officer who helped 1863 "Glory" charge toward Ft. Wagner 1863                                                                        
Statesmen |Koerber - 1920s friend, then foe of Hitler |The Viktor von Koerber WWI Aviation Archive|
Presentation keys, gold medal to major U.K. statesman  Award Documents to important 19th century European diplomats

The JFK and staffers convention badges etc. ArchiveI.D. Badges to JFK and Secretary Ev Lincoln Mass. Labor Federation badge (major speech)  1960 Democratic Nomination campaign: aide Bob Troutman

Heroines | "Girl who defied Hitler" at 1936 Olympics: biography  Inge Sorensen Archive: items                 First ever (gold NYC) Women's Club Medal of Honor
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The Poignant Mayer family Jewish Heroism for (in WWI) and Flight from (pre-WWII) Germany Archive 
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US WWII WASP service certificate to 1st winner of Amelia Earhart Scholarship

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Medal commemorating the first Chain Reaction research, conducted by Joliot, Halban, and Kowarski 1939 (w/ French text);  a copy of this medal, unboxed, is in the Fermi archive (of seventeen medals, incl. his Nobel Prize) at the University of Chicago Regenstein library. ..
See http://ead.lib.uchicago.edu/view.xqy?id=ICU.SPCL

FERMI&view=xml

note "Einstein 1905" and "Chadwick 1932"

Henri Becquerel (1852-1908) Radioactivity 1896 Medal: Bronze, 58 mm. diameter, by Royal Begeer, of Voorschoten, Holland; inscribed on rim "SIR JAMES CHADWICK" by vendor; weighs 94 grams.

A copy of this medal, unboxed, is in the Fermi archive (of seventeen medals, incl. his Nobel Prize) at the University of Chicago Regenstein library. ..
See http://ead.lib.uchicago.edu/view.xqy?id=ICU.SPCLFERMI&view=xml

European Awards to Sir James Chadwick

Scroll down for:
1  Medal (French text) commemorating the first Chain Reaction    
       research, 1939
2  The Royal Academy of Science, Humanities and Fine Arts
       of Belgium, Associate Membership diploma, 1945
3  The Gustave Trasenster 'Gold’ Medal of merit in science, 1946
4  The Henri Becquerel (1852-1908) Radioactivity 1896 Medal
5  The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences 
       150th Anniversary Medal, 1958 
6  The Rutherford Centennial Medal of the Soviet
       Academy of Sciences 

The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences (In Dutch: Koninklijke Nederlandse Academie van Wetenschappen, abbreviated: KNAW) is an organisation dedicated to the advancement of science and literature in the Netherlands. The Academy is housed at the Trippenhuis, Kloveniersburgwal 29, in Amsterdam.
In addition to various advisory and administrative functions it operates a number of research institutes and awards many prizes, including the Lorentz Medal in theoretical physics, the Leeuwenhoek Medal in microbiology, and the Dr. A.H. Heineken prizes.

Main functions of the Academy
The Academy advises the Dutch government on scientific matters. While its advice often pertains to genuine scientific concerns, it also counsels the government on such topics as policy on careers for researchers or the Netherlands' contribution to major international projects. The Academy offers solicited and unsolicited advice to parliament, ministries, universities and research institutes, funding agencies and international organisations.
·  Advising the government on matters related to scientific research
·  Assessing the quality of scientific research (peer review)
· Providing a forum for the scientific world and promoting international   scientific cooperation
·  Acting as an umbrella organisation for the institutes primarily engaged in basic and strategic scientific research and disseminating information


Members and Organization of the Academy
The members (at most 200 regular members younger than 65) are appointed for life by co-optation. Nominations for candidate membership by persons or organizations outside the Academy are accepted. The acceptance criterion is delivered scientific achievements. Academy membership is therefore regarded as a great honor, and prestigious. Besides regular members, there are retired members (members older than 65 years old), regular members living abroad, foreign members, and corresponding members.
The Royal Netherlands Academy of Arts and Sciences has long embraced the entire field of learning. The Royal Academy comprises two departments:

· Science (mathematics, physics, astronomy, life sciences, and engineering sciences) with 110 regular members;
· Humanities and Social Sciences (humanities, law, behavioural sciences and social sciences) with 90 regular members.

Both departments have their own board. The departments, in turn, are divided into sections. The highest organ in the Academy is the general meeting of members, the united meeting of both departments.

History
During the French occupation of the Dutch Republic, it was founded as the Koninklijk Instituut van Wetenschappen, Letterkunde en Schoone Kunsten (Royal Institute of Sciences, Literature and Fine Arts) by Lodewijk Napoleon on May 4, 1808. After the occupation, in 1816, it was renamed to Koninklijk-Nederlandsch Instituut van Wetenschappen, Letteren en Schoone Kunsten. In 1851 it was disbanded and reestablished as the Koninklijke Akademie van Wetenschappen and in 1938 acquired its present name.

Kowarski, Lev (1907-1979) Russian-French physicist who was born in St. Petersburg …and died in Geneva…. He was educated in Belgium and France…. With Frédéric Joliot-Curie, he discovered in 1939 that several neutrons were emitted in the fission of uranium-235. He then moved to England and Canada (1940-45). After the war he worked at CEA in Paris, and CERN in Geneva. Kowarski built the first nuclear reactors in Canada and France.
From http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/biography/Kowarski.html
_____________________________________________________________
Dr. Hans Halban, atomic scientist … Paris, Nov. 29…. He was 56.… After he fled his native Austria, he … came to France shortly before… World War II, and joined the research staff at the College de France. In January 1939 Otto Hahn and Fritz Strassmann of Germany succeeded in splitting the atom. Two months later, Drs. Joliot-Curie, Halban, and Leo Kowarski announced the possibility of creating nuclear chain reactions…. From then… the scientists had received some rare heavy water from Norway. Dr. Joliot-Curie, fearing the spur this might give to… the Germans if it fell into their hands, ordered Dr. Halban and Dr. Kowarski to take the heavy water to England.… After the war, Dr. Halban directed a  nuclear research laboratory at Orsay.
 From 1964 N.Y. Times

Frédéric Joliot-Curie (1900 - 1958)
Jean Frédéric Joliot was born in Paris, France, on March 19, 1900. He was a graduate of the School of Chemistry and Physics in Paris. In 1925, he became an assistant to Marie Curie at the Radium Institute and fell in love with her daughter Irène Curie. He married her in 1926, and they both changed their surnames to Joliot-Curie.
He obtained his Doctor of Science degree in 1930, and became lecturer in the Paris Faculty of Science in 1935. At this time, he carried out considerable research on the structure of the atom, generally in collaboration with his wife. In particular, they worked on the projection of the nuclei, with was an essential step in the discovery of the neutron and the positron. However, their greatest discovery was artificial radioactivity. In 1935, the two received the Nobel Prize for Chemistry for this important discovery.
In 1937, Joliot-Curie left the Radium Institute to become a professor at the College de France, working on chain reactions and the requirements for the successful construction of a nuclear reactor that uses controlled nuclear fission to generate energy through the use of uranium and heavy water. At the time of the Nazi invasion in 1940, Joliot managed to smuggle his working documents and materials to England. He was one of the scientists mentioned in Albert Einstein's 1939 letter to President Roosevelt as one of the leading scientists on the course to chain reactions. However, World War II stalled Joliot-Curie's research, as did his subsequent post-war administrative duties. He was on the ALSOS list, which is the Manhattan Project's military intelligence effort to capture known enemy nuclear scientists in an attempt to learn how far Germany had progressed in its efforts to develop a nuclear weapon.
During the French occupation, Joliot-Curie took an active part in the Resistance; he was President of the National Front and formed the French Communist Party. After the war, he served as director of the Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique and became France's first High Commissioner for Atomic Energy. In 1948, he oversaw the construction of the first French atomic reactor. A devout Communist, he was relieved of his duties in 1950 for political reasons. He was one of the 11 signatories to the Russell-Einstein Manifesto in 1955. Although he retained his professorship at the College de France, on the death of his wife in 1956, he succeeded her as Chair of Nuclear Physics at the Sorbonne.
Joliot-Curie and his wife had one daughter, Helene, and one son, Pierre. He died in Paris on August 14, 1958.

Book pertaining to the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences Anniversary Medal:
De leden van de akademie 1808-2000, Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen

Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences 150th Anniversary
Medal , 1808-1958
, 60 mm. diameter; 550 bronze medals were struck
and distributed, and 1 silver medal for the Queen.

The Rutherford Centennial Medal (of Soviet Academy of Sciences, 500 issued, 1971; bronze, inscriptions in Russian and Latin; w/ typed note “to Sir James Chadwick from P.L. Kapitza”;  bronze, 60 mm. diameter, weighs 130 grams.  Silk moire case is 94 mm. square, w/ silk & velvet interior.

The Gustave Trasenster 'Gold’ Medal of merit in science, awarded to Chadwick in 1946, instituted in 1932. Silver medal is 70 mm. diameter, weighs 184 grams. Sheepskin case is 116 mm. square, w/ interior of silk & wool.  Inscription (on reverse, from "8 o'clock" to "4 o'clock") "Medaille G. TRASENSTER decernee par de l'Association des Ingenieurs sortis de l'Universite de LIEGE" means "G. Trasenster Medal decreed by the Association of Engineers out of the University of Liege."

ROYAL ACADEMY


Of Science, Humanities and Fine Arts of Belgium
______________________


The Division of Sciences

THE ROYAL ACADEMY, in its meeting of 15
December 1945, appoint

Mr. James Chadwick, of Liverpool
Associate of the section of Sciences, mathematics, and physics.

The Division decides at the same time to deliver to Mr. Chadwick the presentation diploma, endowed with the seal and signature of its Director and of its permanent Secretary,
Done at Brussels, 15 December 1945.

The permanent Secretary                                       The Director
(Signature)                                                              (Signature)

From http://www.cfwb.be/arb/EN/presentation.htm

The Royal Academy of Science,
Humanities and Fine Arts of Belgium


A Literary Society was established in Brussels in 1769 under the auspices of the Count of Cobenzl, a plenipotentiary of the Empress Marie-Thérèse, reporting to Prince Charles de Lorraine, the Lieutenant-Governor of the Low Countries. In letters of patent dated 16 December 1772, Marie-Thérèse granted the Literary Society the title of Imperial and Royal Academy of Sciences and Humanities of Brussels, a title to which several privileges were attached. The Sovereign entrusted the members of the new Academy with the task of promoting the country’s intellectual life and stimulating scientific research. Suspended during the twenty-two years of French occupation, the institution was restored by a Royal Decree of 7 May 1816 adopted by King William 1st of the Low Countries. Having survived the 1830 Belgian revolution, the Academy was re-organised under its current title by Royal Decree of King Leopold 1st, who on 1 December 1845 added the Fine Arts Division to the Sciencesand Humanities Divisions.
The Academy’s activities reflect fully the provisions in Article 1 of its Statutes, quoted.below:
“… to promote research and to encourage scientific and artistic undertakings which require its material or moral support. It shall be a centre of cooperation between Belgian scholars, scientists and artists, and between the latter and the scholars, scientists and artists of other countries. It shall publish the work of its members and that of the most deserving researchers, to whom it may award prizes and grants. At the request of the Authorities or on its own initiative, it may express any opinion it considers likely to serve the interests of the Sciences, Humanities and Fine Arts.”
The Academy consists of 90 members, 60 correspondent members and 150 associate members (foreign members). There are three Divisions: the Division of Sciences, the Division of Humanities and of Moral and Political Sciences, and the Division of Fine Arts, each one comprising thirty members, twenty correspondent members and fifty associate members.

The Division of Sciences

It consists of two sections, each comprising fifteen members, ten correspondent members and twenty-five associate..members. The Mathematical and Physical Sciences Section comprises astronomic, mathematical, physical, chemical and engineering..scientists. The Natural Sciences Section is made up of scholars studying botany, geology, mineralogy, physiology and zoology.

Regulations (translated from French) as included in a 19/09/2006 email from Claudine Voisin; founded in 1932 by the Association of Engineers of the University of Liège, Belgium (founded 1847) (from http://www.ailg.be/).

Chadwick award date is from http://janus.lib.cam.ac.uk/db/node.xsp?id=EAD/GBR/0014/CHAD IV 13 )


Regulations


1) Gold medal of merit of science is awarded for exceptional merit for those who have succeeded in advanced invention work in the field of sciences and the services that they have rendered to the faculty of sciences applicable to the University of Liege for the objective and collaboration with the central faculty.

2) Gold medal of merit of science is granted to every person preferred by the A.E. of the U. of Liege.
..
3) The criteria for motivation of this distinction will be connected to:
-- the nature of the scientific recognition coming to the study or invention
-- the importance of the impact from the covered sphere
-- the career of the candidate
-- the depth of the link woven with U. of Liege

4) The proposal for the conferment of the Gold medal of merit of science originates with at least three (3) members of the Scientific Committee of the A.E. of the U. of Liege and will be witnessed by them. They will be submitted to the Scientific Committee in writing. They will have to produce evidence of an agreement of a 2/3 majority of the Committee. The Council of the Administration of the A.E. of the U. of Liege will return the final decision, certain of the foundation of an agreement of the Scientific Committee, and it, likewise with a 2/3 majority.

5) The honor will be granted in each odd year, starting in 2003. There will be a Gold Medal, which will be presented at a dignified public meeting.

Antoine Henri Becquerel was born in Paris on December 15, 1852, a member of a distinguished family of scholars and scientists. His father, Alexander Edmond Becquerel, was a Professor of Applied Physics and had done research on solar radiation and on phosphorescence, while his grandfather, Antoine César, had been a Fellow of the Royal Society and the inventor of an electrolytic method for extracting metals from their ores. He entered the Polytechnic in 1872, then the government department of Pontset-Chaussees in 1874, becoming ingénieur in 1877 and being promoted to ingénieur-en-chef in 1894. In 1888 he acquired the degree of docteur-ès-sciences. From 1878 he had held an appointment as an Assistant at the Museum of Natural History, taking over from his father in the Chair of Applied Physics at the Conservatoire des Arts et Metiers. In 1892 he was appointed Professor of Applied Physics in the Department of Natural History at the Paris Museum. He became a Professor at the Polytechnic in 1895.


Becquerel's earliest work was concerned with the plane polarization of light, with the phenomenon of phosphorescence and with the absorption of light by crystals (his doctorate thesis). He also worked on the subject of terrestrial magnetism. In 1896, his previous work was overshadowed by his discovery of the phenomenon of natural radioactivity. Following a discussion with Henri Poincaré on the radiation which had recently been discovered by Röntgen (X-rays) and which was accompanied by a type of phosphorescence in the vacuum tube, Becquerel decided to investigate whether there was any connection between X-rays and naturally occurring 

phosphorescence. He had inherited from his father a supply of uranium salts, which phosphoresce on exposure to light. When the salts were placed near to a photographic plate covered with opaque paper, the plate was discovered to be fogged. The phenomenon was found to be common to all the uranium salts studied and was concluded to be a property of the uranium atom. Later, Becquerel showed that the rays emitted by uranium, which for a long time were named after their discoverer, caused gases to ionize and that they differed from X-rays in that they could be deflected by electric or magnetic fields. For his discovery of spontaneous radioactivity Becquerel was awarded half of the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1903, the other half being given to Pierre and Marie Curie for their study of the Becquerel radiation.
Becquerel published his findings in many papers, principally in the Annales de Physique et de Chimie and the Comptes Rendus de l'Academie des Sciences.
He was elected a member of the Academie des Sciences de France in 1889 and succeeded Berthelot as Life Secretary of that body. He was a member also of the Accademia dei Lincei and of the Royal Academy of Berlin, amongst others. He was made an Officer of the Legion of Honour in 1900.
He was married to Mlle. Janin, the daughter of a civil engineer. They had a son Jean, b. 1878, who was also a physicist: the fourth generation of scientists in the Becquerel family.
Antoine Henri Becquerel died at Le Croisic on August 25, 1908.

from http://nobelprize.org/physics/laureates/1903/becquerel-bio.html .

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From Cathcart, Brian, The Fly in the Cathedral: How a Group of Cambridge Scientists Won the International Race to Split the Atom, pp. 42-46, on Chadwick’s resolving of the Cambridge-Vienna Controversy, which culminated in Chadwick‘s late 1927 visit to Vienna, during which Chadwick proved that Pettersson‘s assistants were miscounting alpha particles:
“It was Chadwick who took matters in hand, recognizing the fundamental nature of the challenge and returning to first principles…. He saw that the source of these conflicting results must lie in the equipment, the working practices, or the scientists themselves…. Inevitably some people were more reliable counters than others. Chadwick was said to have an almost superhuman accuracy rate while Rutherford was a mediocre counter despite his long experience…. The tests left no doubt…. It was a shocking humiliation for the Vienna team.  Meyer… offered to issue a formal retraction … but remarkably Chadwick, acting on what he believed would be Rutherford’s wishes, declined the offer.”

Roger H. Stuewer, University of Minnesota, "Nuclear Disintegration and the Cambridge-Vienna Controversy", 2006

Abstract: I will trace the origin, development, and surprising resolution of a controversy during 1922-1928 between Ernest Rutherford and James Chadwick at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge and Hans Pettersson and Gerhard Kirsch at the Institute for Radium Research in Vienna, a controversy that centered on the questions of which nuclei can be disintegrated by alpha particles with the emission of protons, whether these protons can be observed under particular experimental conditions, and how this disintegration process should be interpreted theoretically. We will see that these scientific issues became entangled in a web of personal and institutional rivalries that greatly raised the stakes in the outcome of the controversy, and that illustrate how physics functions in an intensely competitive atmosphere.

From http://www.physics.indiana.edu/~colloquium/2006-Spring/stuewer.shtml

Stefan Meyer (27 April 1872 – 29 December 1949) was an Austrian physicist involved in research on radioactivity. He became director of the Institute for Radium Research in Vienna and received the Lieben Prize in 1913 for his research on radium. He was the brother of Hans Leopold Meyer who was also awarded the Lieben Prize.

Life and work:  Stefan was the second son of the lawyer and notary Gotthelf Karl Meyer and his wife Clara (née Goldschmidt, sister of Victor Goldschmidt). He went to school in Vienna and later graduated from gymnasium in Horn in 1892. He studied physics at the University of Vienna and attended the University of Leipzig for one year. He obtained his PhD in 1896 for work with Franz Serafin Exner. In 1897, Meyer became assistant of Ludwig Boltzmann at the Institute for Theoretical Physics, University of Vienna. His research was dedicated to magnetic permeability of liquids. After a talk of Friedrich Oskar Giesel – a pioneer in the research and production of radium – he obtained a sample of radium from Giesel to determine magnetic properties of the new element. Meyer and his colleague Egon von Schweidler were able to show that the Becquerel rays (beta rays) could be deflected by magnetic fields; this effect was discovered simultaneously by several scientists, but Meyer et al. also showed that the radiation from polonium (alpha rays) behaved differently in the magnetic field.

Meyer was able to organize the production of 4 grams of radium, as recommended in 1901 by the Austrian Academy of Sciences. The chemical plant of Auer von Welsbach, which was used to produce rare earth elements, provided the necessary technical equipment and knowledge for separation of small quantities of material from ore. Meyer became interim head of the institute for one year after the suicide of Boltzmann. During that time, Meyer had also contacted Lise Meitner before she left for Berlin in 1907. Meyer became assistant of Exner in 1908 and professor in 1909. The ample supply of radium which he shared with the Curies in Paris, Rutherford in Manchester and Ramsey in London made him a key figure in the research on radium.

The only larger source for radium-containing pitchblende was the Sankt Joachimsthal mines, which were located in Austria-Hungary. To improve the industrial use and mining of radium, Austrian industrialist Karl Kupelwieser donated 500,000 Austrian kronen to found an institute for research on radium in 1908. In 1910, the Institute for Radium Research in Vienna was opened. Meyer became its first acting director, and Exner was the director of the institute. The institute in Vienna opened two years before the Institute du Radium in Paris.

During the time when Meyer was acting director, a number of prominent scientists worked at the institute, including George de Hevesy, Victor Francis Hess and Friedrich Paneth. With the Anschluss Österreichs in 1938, the annexation of Austria by Nazi Germany, Meyer as a Jew had to leave office. He requested retirement before he was forced out of the institute. He stayed in his house in the countryside of Austria and, because of the intervention of several people, was left unharmed for the rest of the war. His older brother Hans Leopold Meyer, a professor of chemistry, was less protected and was killed in the Theresienstadt concentration camp in 1942. After the war, Meyer was rehabilitated and allowed to return to his Institute as director. Meyer died in 1949.

Publications: Stefan Meyer published several articles on radioactivity together with Schweidler. He compiled most of the findings on radioactivity in a book. This book became a standard German textbook on radioactivity, similar to the book of Curie in French and the book by Rutherford in English. During his forced retirement, he wrote a book on musical instruments and acoustics.
  

From http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stefan_Meyer_(physicist)

Diploma is 380
x 290 mm.

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The Royal Academy of Science, Humanities and Fine Arts of Belgium

Associate Membership diploma presented to Chadwick, 1945; 380 x 290 mm. (translation from French)

Stefan Meyer Medal, 25th anniversary of the Vienna Institute for Radium Research, 1935.

Chadwick did Meyer a major favor in the 1920's, by resolving a physics controversy in a most generous, private way, instead of publicly gloating over what was a humiliating research result for Meyer's subordinates at the Institute. See below excerpts from The Fly in the Cathedral and "Nuclear Disintegration and the Cambridge-Vienna Controversy".

(only the cover has survived)

Meyer's brother would have worn this* before his murder by the Nazis

* Above is just a depiction,
an original of which is not provided in the group for sale.

J.A. Schramek
& Associates

Weighs 125 g.

From http://nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/physics/laureates/1935/chadwick-bio.html

James Chadwick was born in Cheshire, England, on 20th October, 1891, the son of John Joseph Chadwick and Anne Mary Knowles. He attended Manchester High School prior to entering Manchester University in 1908; he graduated from the Honours School of Physics in 1911 and spent the next two years under Professor (later Lord) Rutherford in the Physical Laboratory in Manchester, where he worked on various radioactivity problems, gaining his M.Sc. degree in 1913. That same year he was awarded the 1851 Exhibition Scholarship and proceeded to Berlin to work in the Physikalisch Technische Reichsanstalt at Charlottenburg under Professor H. Geiger.

During World War I, he was interned in the Zivilgefangenenlager, Ruhleben. After the war, in 1919, he returned to England to accept the Wollaston Studentship at Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge, and to resume work under Rutherford, who in the meantime had moved to the Cavendish Laboratory, Cambridge. Rutherford had succeeded that year in disintegrating atoms by bombarding nitrogen with alpha particles, with the emission of a proton. This was the first artificial nuclear transformation. In Cambridge, Chadwick joined Rutherford in accomplishing the transmutation of other light elements by bombardment with alpha particles, and in making studies of the properties and structure of atomic nuclei.

He was elected Fellow of Gonville and Caius College (1921-1935) and became Assistant Director of Research in the Cavendish Laboratory (1923). In 1927 he was elected a Fellow of the Royal Society.

In 1932, Chadwick made a fundamental discovery in the domain of nuclear science: he proved the existence of neutrons - elementary particles devoid of any electrical charge. In contrast with the helium nuclei (alpha rays) which are charged, and therefore repelled by the considerable electrical forces present in the nuclei of heavy atoms, this new tool in atomic disintegration need not overcome any electric barrier and is capable of penetrating and splitting the nuclei of even the heaviest elements. Chadwick in this way prepared the way towards the fission of uranium 235 and towards the creation of the atomic bomb. For this epoch-making discovery he was awarded the Hughes Medal of the Royal Society in 1932, and subsequently the Nobel Prize for Physics in 1935.

He remained at Cambridge until 1935 when he was elected to the Lyon Jones Chair of Physics in the University of Liverpool. From 1943 to 1946 he worked in the United States as Head of the British Mission attached to the Manhattan Project for the development of the atomic bomb. He returned to England and, in 1948, retired from active physics and his position at Liverpool on his election as Master of Gonville and Caius College, Cambridge. He retired from this Mastership in 1959. From 1957 to 1962 he was a parttime member of the United Kingdom Atomic Energy Authority.

Chadwick has had many papers published on the topic of radioactivity and connected problems and, with Lord Rutherford and C. D. Ellis, he is co-author of the book Radiations from Radioactive substances (1930).

Sir James was knighted in 1945. Apart from the Hughes Medal (Royal Society) mentioned above, he received the Copley Medal (1950) and the Franklin Medal of the Franklin Institute, Philadelphia (1951). He is an Honorary Fellow of the Institute of Physics and, in addition to receiving honorary doctorate degrees from the Universities of Reading, Dublin, Leeds, Oxford, Birmingham, Montreal (McGill), Liverpool, and Edinburgh, he is a member of several foreign academies, being Associé oft he Académie Royale de Belgique; Foreign Member of the Kongelige Danske Videnskabernes Selskab and the Koninklijke Nederlandse Akademie van Wetenschappen; Corresponding Member of the Sächsische Akademie der Wissenschaften, Leipzig; Member of the Pontificia Academia Scientiarum and the Franklin Institute; Honorary Member of the American Philosophical Society and the American Physical Society.

In 1925, he married Aileen Stewart-Brown of Liverpool. They have twin daughters, and live at Denbigh, North Wales. His hobbies include gardening and fishing.

From Nobel Lectures, Physics 1922-1941, Elsevier Publishing Company, Amsterdam, 1965

This autobiography/biography was written at the time of the award and first published in the book series Les Prix Nobel. It was later edited and republished in Nobel Lectures. To cite this document, always state the source as shown above.

Sir James Chadwick died on July 24, 1974.

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Home  Products - site map  About Us
Outstanding Awards |

High objects of State (letters patent from Queen Victoria, each w/ Great Seal):
Author of Balfour Declaration - 1898 diplomatic credentials, for talks with Germany
|
Chancellor of the Exchequer letters patent of Gladstone, 1873 

The (Swedish General) Viktor Balck Olympic Games- Founding Archive
Swedish gold and bronze medals honoring Viktor Balck | Viktor Balck 1912 Stockholm Olympics book Tower and Sword collar of Viktor Balck

Civil War Gillmore Medal to Jewish officer who helped 1863 "Glory" charge toward Ft. Wagner 1863                                                                        
Statesmen |Koerber - 1920s friend, then foe of Hitler |The Viktor von Koerber WWI Aviation Archive|
Presentation keys, gold medal to major U.K. statesman  Award Documents to important 19th century European diplomats

The JFK and staffers convention badges etc. ArchiveI.D. Badges to JFK and Secretary Ev Lincoln Mass. Labor Federation badge (major speech)  1960 Democratic Nomination campaign: aide Bob Troutman

Heroines | "Girl who defied Hitler" at 1936 Olympics: biography  Inge Sorensen Archive: items                 First ever (gold NYC) Women's Club Medal of Honor
  Award Diplomas to great Jewess opera singer
The Poignant Mayer family Jewish Heroism for (in WWI) and Flight from (pre-WWII) Germany Archive 
Presentation trowel etc. to president of "philanthropic" society for troubled girls

Concepts | News |
Historical commentary

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